“The best man for the job is a woman”

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Although many of the accomplishments and contributions of women have been lost from the history books, women have played a vital role in the course of human civilization. From raising families to leading armies, women have made untold contributions to history. I would say that the world right now has benefited from women leadership in many areas. Politics, leadership, economy, sports, entertainment and many more. The fourth and final day of the 2016 Democratic national convention has ended, if you don’t count the ongoing balloon-related activity on the floor, where dozens of delegates continue to linger.

 
The former first lady, senator and secretary of state set her sights on the White House and blasted Republican nominee Donald Trump,…….(If I were her, I should not have done that) portraying him as a small man who got rich by stifling workers, who peddles fear and who lacks the temperament to be commander-in-chief. Yea, I was also caught off on that. She quickly reached out to disappointed Bernie Sanders voters at the end of a convention dedicated to healing the deep rift from their contentious primary race. With the Vermont senator watching from the arena, Clinton told his supporters: “I’ve heard you. Your cause is our cause.” Yea, showing leadership. Today, Hillary Clinton joins an ever growing list of women who have put an impact in this “our” land we live in……..this includes your mothers, wives, sisters and daughters.

 

History reminds us. The date was August 18, 1920, and the man was Harry Burn, a 24-year-old representative from East Tennessee who two years earlier had become the youngest member of the state legislature. The red rose signified his opposition to the proposed 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which stated that “[t]he right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” By the summer of 1920, 35 states had ratified the measure, bringing it one vote short of the required 36. In Tennessee, it had sailed through the Senate but stalled in the House of Representatives, prompting thousands of pro- and anti-suffrage activists to descend upon Nashville. If Burn and his colleagues voted in its favor, the 19th Amendment would pass the final hurdle on its way to adoption. There came-“The Mother Who Saved Suffrage: Passing the 19th Amendment”

 

During World War II, some 350,000 women served in the U.S. Armed Forces, both at home and abroad. They included the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, who on March 10, 2010, were awarded the prestigious Congressional Gold Medal. Meanwhile, widespread male enlistment left gaping holes in the industrial labor force. Between 1940 and 1945, the female percentage of the U.S. workforce increased from 27 percent to nearly 37 percent, and by 1945 nearly one out of every four married women worked outside the home. Perhaps the best-known figure from the American Revolutionary era who wasn’t a president, general or statesman, Betsy Ross (1752-1836) became a patriotic icon in the late 19th century when stories surfaced that she had sewn the first “stars and stripes” U.S. flag in 1776. Though that story is likely apocryphal, Ross is known to have sewn flags during the Revolutionary War.

 

First lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), wife of Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945), the U.S. president from 1933 to 1945, was a leader in her own right and involved in numerous humanitarian causes throughout her life. The niece of President Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), Eleanor was born into a wealthy New York family. She married Franklin Roosevelt, her fifth cousin once removed, in 1905. By the 1920s, Roosevelt, who raised five children, was involved in Democratic Party politics and numerous social reform organizations. In the White House, she was one of the most active first ladies in history and worked for political, racial and social justice. After President Roosevelt’s death, Eleanor was a delegate to the United Nations and continued to serve as an advocate for a wide range of human rights issues. She remained active in Democratic causes and was a prolific writer until her death at age 78.

 

My favorite, Harriet Tubman became famous as a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad during the turbulent 1850s. Born a slave on Maryland’s eastern shore, she endured the harsh existence of a field hand, including brutal beatings. In 1849 she fled slavery, leaving her husband and family behind in order to escape. Despite a bounty on her head, she returned to the South at least 19 times to lead her family and hundreds of other slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad. Tubman also served as a scout, spy and nurse during the Civil War. Again we remember the “Yes We Can Do It” lady- American women entered the workforce in unprecedented numbers during World War II, as widespread male enlistment left gaping holes in the industrial labor force. Between 1940 and 1945, the female percentage of the U.S. workforce increased from 27 percent to nearly 37 percent, and by 1945 nearly one out of every four married women worked outside the home. “Rosie the Riveter,” star of a government campaign aimed at recruiting female workers for the munitions industry, became perhaps the most iconic image of working women during the war. Later it became “Yes We Can” by yours truly Barrack Obama.

 

One last one, On Election Day in 1920, millions of American women exercised their right to vote for the first time. For almost 100 years, women (and men) had been fighting to win that right: They had made speeches, signed petitions, marched in parades and argued over and over again that women, like men, deserved all of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. The leaders of this campaign did not always agree with one another–in fact, sometimes their disagreements threatened to derail their movement–but each was committed to the enfranchisement of all American women. This November 2016, America will make history again by having a woman on its ballot, for this great country, it will be a great achievement.

 

I would not say that this is the century for the woman, every century has been for the woman but today, women leadership has began to thrive more and more and to the benefit of society. From Germany, UK, Africa, and now the United States of America. I have said that “the best man for the job is a woman”-you now see why. This is the moment for women to celebrate how far they have come-and to the great future ahead. I do not say that we will not have wars, but maybe we wont, the fact that households have thrived under the management of our mothers means that our countries can too under their leadership. I am not American-but I speak to Americans. Please vote wisely, make history.

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Author: davidaswani

ati Aswani IMG_9441 I am an enterprise consultant, a creative and a tech enthusiast. Am also undertaking my certification in network security at the Cisco Academy. In my spare time, I improve my skills through training’s, tech gatherings and networking. Some of the things that am passionate about is traveling, art, volunteering and cycling, those are the things that keep my blood circulating.

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