Young People Taking Advantage of Informal Employment in Kenya.

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Have you ever wondered to yourself how far can something benefit someone, how far does business travel. How amazing does business work, that something made in a different country ends up in the hands of someone in the other side of the continent. It’s just really strange, unbelievable, in fact on what really ends up being the centre of your life. Today, young people have employed themselves in many ways, what they would call “informal sector” of business.

The informal sector as described by google refers to those workers who are self employed, or who work for those who are self employed. People who earn a living through self employment in most cases are not on payrolls, and thus are not taxed. Many Many Informal workers do their businesses in unprotected and unsecured places.

The informal sector, informal economy, or grey economy is the part of an economy that is neither taxed, nor monitored by any form of government. Unlike the formal economy, activities of the informal economy are not included in the gross national product (GNP) and gross domestic product (GDP) of a country.

So who would have thought that when the english premier league is playing in the land of the queen, somebody will be earning a living on the same in a remote part of Kenya? How informal is that? Just imagine you own a football viewing center that has a sitting capacity of 100 and for each football match, your customers pay 50 shillings per match. Multiply that 50 shillings by 100 and you will have a whopping Shs 5,000 per match. Multiply this by 3 since Chelsea. Arsenal and Manchester United games are the most likely to be full. What do you have> Sh 15,000 on a weekend.  In a month, you will have close to 60,000 shillings.

Kenyans love soccer. Not just Kenyans but Africans in general. We love the blues, gunners and so many others. We wish we could be present in some of these football matches, but as much as we love football, most people still cannot afford to subscribe to DSTV and watch the matches from the comfort of their homes and that’s where my brother saw the opportunity, putting up a makeshift structure on one corner of our home and with demand kept extending it. Today, he has four TVs, connected to DSTV, KWESE and Bean Sport…….to enable him stay on top of his game as far making his customers happy.

Speaking to my brother, i asked how is business……..which business he replies, you have to be specific because I do many business. That takes me back, but then we end up talking about the one he claims has made him famous, everyone comes here to watch football he says…the best days are when we have a derby and when university is in session, student flock the arena de barcelona in their numbers, not the one that is in Spain ofcourse. He says that with a smile. If this numbers are interesting to you, remember in business you lose some and you win some.

The interesting thing with his business is that there is no book that can explain how to start this kind of business. But I have done some observation every time I have paid him a visit, at arena de barcelona.

What You Need to Start a Football Viewing Center

(1) Wooden benches to save start up costs. Plastic chairs are better but they are often damaged during the celebrations of goals and match wins.

(2) A good generator and possibly a UPS in case of power outage to keep the TV running

(3) Cable TV or DSTV dish with monthly subscription

(4) A big Television set with high resolution or projectors – if you can afford the more the better.

(5) A refrigerator just in case you want to add an extra income stream by selling cold soft drinks

(6) A printed ticket or coupons to identifying paying customers

What next?

1. Get an ideal location

A middle-class residential estate with high population is usually the best place to start this kind of business. Get a good location; a location or building that has enough room for expansion. If it’s an open space like a football field, then you may need to get a carpenter to form a tent shed using zinc; and ensure that the structure is wide enough to contain a good number of people.

2. Set it up

If you are on a low budget, the next thing to do is to get a carpenter to make wood benches for you as it minimizes start up costs and contains a lot more people. But if you have enough capital, you can opt for single plastic chairs as they are more comfortable.

You must also ensure that the room or building is properly ventilated; so as to make your customers feel comfortable. If they don’t feel comfortable watching football matches in your viewing center, then there’s a high chance they will patronize your competitors. Do you want that? I guess NO.

After getting all set up, sure you follow these management tips;

a. Get a blackboard or notice board outside your football center to write out all upcoming matches for the day.

b. Have someone to maintain order. Football viewing can turn chaotic at times.

c. Treat your customers with respect. Customers are the backbone of every business! Be friendly to your customers. They are the sole reason you  are still in business. Treat them with respect, and try to build personal relationships with them.

As a final note, if you are currently unemployed, you could try out this business. It doesn’t require much capital to start and it’s very easy to manage, if you know what you are doing.

Job is one of those young people who have mastered this art and they are making a living out of it, and I will not forget….Which business…..you have to be specific.

 

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Author: davidaswani

ati Aswani IMG_9441 I am an enterprise consultant, a creative and a tech enthusiast. Am also undertaking my certification in network security at the Cisco Academy. In my spare time, I improve my skills through training’s, tech gatherings and networking. Some of the things that am passionate about is traveling, art, volunteering and cycling, those are the things that keep my blood circulating.

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