The Future of Life and Health.

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Today was my doctors appointment, and yes I am not pregnant. I am sitting here ready to see one of the most sought-after dermatologist, and still I am amazed at how I can afford him. His consultation ….just to see your face, is Ksh7,000 to a Kenyan to a Chinese $70 and I tell you….that Chinese man walked away.

Many a times I write on this wall on the things shity, things I am not happy about, but today…..testing the true advancement in first life and health, the former that makes me alive and the later to be able to see the doctor and know that minutes after my appointment my life will have improved.

Norberg wrote that life expectancy in Kenya increased by almost ten years between 2003 and 2013. After having lived, loved and struggled for a whole decade, the average person in Kenya had not lost a single of our remaining lifetime. Everyone gets ten years older, yet death has not come a step closer.

Yellow Fever for example, a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes, was so named because its victims turned that color before dying in agony. According to an account of an 1878 Memphis epidemic, the sick had “crawled into holes twisted out of shape, their bodies discovered later only by the stench of their decaying flesh…….(A mother was found dead) with her body sprawled across the bed…..black vomit like coffee grounds splattered all over…..the children rolling on the floor, groaning.” (Pardon the description) But you get the point.

The rich were not spared either. FDR, the 32nd President of the United States was stuck by polio in 1921 when he was 39 years.

Being here has helped me to give thought to many advancement in health and life. I can single out my favorite example in the history of english language. It comes from the first sentence of a Wikipedia entry:

Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by either of two virus variants, Variola and Variola minor.

Yes, “Smallpox was”

Karl, saved a billion lives by his discovery of blood groups. The heroes did not stop there. Abel Wolman discovery of Chlorination of water saved 177 million, measles vaccine by John Enders saved 120 million, smallpox eradication strategy by William Foege saved 131 million, Penicillin Howard Florey 82 million……and the list will be endless if you give it much thought.

In Stalin’s law on war on death-“Things that can’t go on forever don’t”……as amended by Davies’s Corollary…..”Things that can’t go on forever can go much longer than you think.”

And that’s the world right now.

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The Sad Ending of Lord Egerton.

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The story of Lord Egerton is a really sad one. Maurice Egerton (4 August 1874 – 30 January 1958) was the fourth Baron Egerton. He was a member of the Egerton family and was the only son of Alan de Tatton Egerton, 3rd Baron Egerton and his wife Lady Anna Louisa.

Maurice was known as an aviation and motor car enthusiast, a friend to the Wright brothers. He served as a lieutenant in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve during the First World War after which he was granted some land in Ngata area near Nakuru in Kenya under the Soldier Settlement Scheme.

He later purchased a further 21,000 acres around the same area from Lord Delamere. On this land, he founded a school in 1939 named Egerton Farm School (now Egerton University). The school was meant to prepare white European youth for careers in agriculture.

But the story starts when he build his second house for his bride to be. And on seeing the house she said, you have build a house for chickens. Taking it as a challenge he started building another house, this time bigger and better. Close to the Castles that rested in the Land of the then King George VI.

Lord Egerton Castle as its known now was build from from 1938 to 1954. It’s said that he imported most of the things that he used to build this important castle. The castle has 52 rooms. Among them; dance hall with electric organ, dark chamber for developing photos, entrance hall, master bedrooms, study rooms and a wine cellar.

The story is later told that on seeing it, his bride to be said that was a house for the horse. And so she did not marry him and from that point its said the lord hated women and so he did chicken. Interestingly, the other culprit was the horse, and he went scort free. In those days I am sure he would not be able to farm….which was his passion without a horse. So it’s safe to say his hate was selfish.

So he never allowed Chicken and women in the compound where the stands. Maurice did not marry and on his death in 1958 the barony became extinct. Today the Castle still stands out, with most things vandalised. Its now the property of Egerton University.

I visited the Castle with my wife when we were celebrating our second year anniversary.  The gardens are really good for weddings and parties. And yes, women and chickens are now allowed to visit the Castle. The ghost of Egerton has rested.

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The inside of the Castle has not been maintained, especially the Bowl room, which if it is kept well can create a really nice experience for those who have never had one.  It’s also a pity that the management would allow something and pricy and eunique as the Organ to be vandalized. I wish more can be done on the inside.

I visited the Ethnographic Museum at the University of Addis Ababa, this was Emperor Haile Selassie’s house that he donated to host the university. It’s a wonderful museum and I wish the management of Lord Egerton Castle would do the same. 

The lady abandoned the house by calling it “chicken house” then the castle she called it “Horse House”. The Lord died and left it where it stood, its should not be abandoned again, it has had enough of it……and it needs justice.

 

Africa Cyber Security Summit 2014.

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The highly anticipated Africa Cyber Security and Forensic Summit that was scheduled for the 27th and 28th September did not happen. This is the first time in my event planning that I was not able to make un event happen.

Organizing events is not an easy job, I have seen events become successful and I have watched other crumbule. I have not been part of one that has crumbled until this week.

We started with a great plan, seeking the partnership of the Kenya Cyber Security and Forensics Association, with expectations that together we will be able to pull together a great event.

We also hired the services of a PR company with was to approach sponsors and raise money that would make the event happen. For  sometime we felt we were on schedule, and we would make it, but as the date approached it became clear that it will be difficult to have the event.

We have not had discussions with the organizing team to see the way forward. Some people are of thought that we should give a new date and keep planning, others think that we should call it a day, at least for this year and plan for another year 2019.

We will keep you updated on what happens, if we will have a new date or if we will plan for the event for 2019.

Amazing Love For Joomla.

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Last week marked the end of a long journey we have travelled to make sure that we put an event together. Organising an event in Nairobi is not easy. Its really difficult getting sponsors for IT event and maybe other events. I have had opportunities to be involved in a number of events, Joomla! Day Ke being one of them.

For four years now, iHub being both the main catalyst for regional tech acceleration and a role model for tech hubs across emerging markets has supported this event by sponsoring a venue for the Joomla User Group – Nairobi and JoomlaDay Event.

Founded in 2010, iHub is a globally recognized organization that is deeply steeped in the local tech innovation culture. We are happy to announce that iHub has been and is still home for JoomlaDay Kenya, and we hope that this will be a partnership that will benefit everyone.

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Joomla! is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) for publishing web content. Over the years Joomla! has won several awards.It is built on a model–view–controller web application framework that can be used independently of the CMS that allows you to build powerful online applications.

As of May 2018, Joomla! has been downloaded over 93 million times. Over 8,000 free and commercial extensions are available from the official Joomla! Extensions Directory, and more are available from other sources. It is estimated to be the second most used content management system on the Internet, after WordPress.

Open Source Matters has always supported Joomla Day Events, depending on the budget they have. JoomlaDay events are officially recognized, but not organized, by the Joomla! Project and Open Source Matters, Inc. Each event is managed independently by a local community.

The participation this year was as balanced as it could be, 50 attendees ranging from Joomla Community in Nairobi, Techies, bading techies and students.

But important to say that the support from Open Source Matters is always not enough to make an event happen, and so the need to bring in more sponsors becomes important.

This year Joomshaper came to our rescue.

JoomShaper is the home of beautifully crafted unique Joomla templates and highly functional extensions along with award winning drag and drop SP Page Builder for you to create your dream website in minutes.

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What was new during this Joomla Day? Apart from a wide range of topics being covered, Networking and discussions, we hosted our first ever Joomla Administrators Exams, the second in Africa.

The Joomla! Certification Program has been created to ensure the competence of Joomla! professionals through documented measurement of skills and knowledge. The program aims to establish a certain standard whilst promoting a qualified workforce.

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Professional certification can play an important role in the decision of a company or business owner when hiring skilled individuals for specific roles. Six people had given interest in doing the certification exam, but only one has the courage to actually do the exam.

We thank iHub for providing the room and dedicated internet to be able to have a successful certification exams. It took a lot of time to get everything ready, being the first time, Joel Mbugua, who was supervising the exam had some difficulty getting things started. This is understandable, but we have a good start.

One of our speakers from Italy couldn’t make it for the event, but he managed to send a video link of his presentation.

Our desire for the future is to push this event to a different city other that Nairobi…..to be able to grow the community.

I thank all the speakers, who have shared knowledge during this event. I thank the people who have worked on our social media campaign and all who worked on the background. What a wonderful team we had, and we hope that you all accept our sincere appreciation.

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We thank all our sponsors and partners, Host sponsors iHub, Open Source Matters, Joomshaper, CMS Africa, Kenic and Kenya Web Experts, whom without their support we would not have succeeded doing this event.

We value your genuine support and partnership.

A Successful JoomlaDay Kenya 2018.

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JoomlaDay event came and went. I would like to thank those who put in the time to volunteer, this includes the speakers. Last year our event did not have a good attendance, in our post event meeting, some of the things we overlocked were the timing of the event which affected the attendance, marketing and promotion.

We decided to start organization of this event in good time, early in the year. We also knew we will face challenges on funding. We started talking with people really early in the year and am happy to say it helped. We were really loud on social media, talking about the event, getting feedback and interacting with other joomlas.

I have said before, organizing an event is not easy, even a small event like JoomlaDay. But having a good team of volunteers really help. Having good partners too. For the first time we had our first Administrators certification Exam. Six people had expressed interest in doing the exam hours to the event. When the day came, only one of those was brave enough to sit for the exam.

It took a lot of time to get everything ready, being the first time, Joel who was supervising the exam had some difficulty getting things started. This is understandable, but we have a good start. One of our speakers from Italy couldn’t make it for the event, but he managed to send a video link of his presentation.

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Our desire for the future is to push this event to a different city other that Nairobi…..to be able to grow the community.

I thank all the speakers, who have shared knowledge during this event. I thank the people who have worked on our social media campaign and all who worked on the background. What a wonderful team we had, and we hope that you all accept our sincere appreciation.

We will be doing this again next year, hopefully in a different city. Check out our Joomla User Group page for more information about the jug meetings.

 

Thanking to Our Sponsors.

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This week will mark the end of a long journey we have travelled to make sure that we up an event together. Organising an event in Nairobi is not easy. Its really difficult getting sponsors for IT event and maybe other events. I have had opportunities to be involved in a number of events, Joomla! Day Ke being one of them.

Joomla! is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) for publishing web content. Over the years Joomla! has won several awards.It is built on a model–view–controller web application framework that can be used independently of the CMS that allows you to build powerful online applications.

As of May 2018, Joomla! has been downloaded over 93 million times. Over 8,000 free and commercial extensions are available from the official Joomla! Extensions Directory, and more are available from other sources. It is estimated to be the second most used content management system on the Internet, after WordPress.

Open Source Matters has always supported Joomla Day Events, depending on the budget they have. JoomlaDay events are officially recognized, but not organized, by the Joomla! Project and Open Source Matters, Inc. Each event is managed independently by a local community.

But important to say that the support from Open Source Matters is always not enough to make an event happen, and so the need to bring in more sponsors becomes important. This year Joomshaper came to our rescue.

JoomShaper is the home of beautifully crafted unique Joomla templates and highly functional extensions along with award winning drag and drop SP Page Builder for you to create your dream website in minutes.

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We would like to thank Joomshaper for supporting this event, and we hope that they will continue to partner with us in the future.

What’s new during this Joomla Day? Apart from a wide range of topics being covered, we will also be carrying out the Joomla Administrators Exams.

The Joomla! Certification Program has been created to ensure the competence of Joomla! professionals through documented measurement of skills and knowledge. The program aims to establish a certain standard whilst promoting a qualified workforce.

Professional certification can play an important role in the decision of a company or business owner when hiring skilled individuals for specific roles.

We welcome you to come and learn, interact and network with tech enthusiast and professional during this event.

For more information please visit http://www.joomladay.or.ke

 

 

 

The 11 Rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela.

Lalibela’s 11 churches are carved out of a hillside, which is made of soft reddish volcanic rock. The churches can be divided into two complexes—a northern and a southeastern complex—that are connected through a series of carved passageways and naturally occurring wadis.

Six churches are featured in the northern complex and four in the southeastern complex. The 11th church—Beta Giyorgis (Church of St. George)—stands alone and is not part of either interconnecting complex.

The northern complex is composed of 6 churches.

Beta Madhane Alem (Church of the Savior of the World)

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Beta Maryam (Church of Mary)

 

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Its two weeks of fasting and churches here were very buy with worshipers coming to pray.

Beta Masqal (Church of the Cross)

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Beta Danagel (Church of the Virgins)

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This is the only church that we couldn’t enter, it is being renovated.

Beta Mika’el (Church of Michael)

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Beta Golgotha (Church of Golgotha)

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The southeastern complex consists of four churches.

Beta Emmanuel (Church of Emmanuel)

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I took this picture from across the bridge, my wife could not handle the height, so she ren.

Beta Abba Libanos (Church of Father Libanos)

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Beta Merkurios (Church of Mercurius)

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Beta Gabriel and Beta Rafa’el (the twin churches of Gabriel and Raphael)

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Located west of the other complexes, the final—and most famous—rock-hewn church of Lalibela is (11) Beta Giyorgis (Church of St. George).

Shaped like a cross, Beta Giyorgis sits on a stepped platform inside a 72-by-72-foot courtyard that is 36 feet deep. Originally, it was accessible only from the west by means of a long approach—measuring nearly 100 feet—that led uphill and connected the church to the wadi below.

Standing at the same level as the church, it is not immediately apparent that Beta Giyorgis is shaped like a cross, but from above, it becomes clear that not only is it shaped like a cross, but that Greek crosses have been carved into its roof as well. Beta Giyorgis has three doors and twelve windows.

This is the masterpiece by king Lalibela.

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This master peace can be seen from very far, the view from up here is breathtaking.

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Each of the windows is adorned by a cross and floral motif carved in relief above its opening. An additional nine false windows are carved into the exterior of the church at the same level as the doors, but they do not open into the church’s interior. Of all the churches at Lalibela, Beta Giyorgis is the best preserved.

Dated to the late 12th or early 13th century, it is also one of the latest churches at the site. The other churches are estimated to have been built over a span of several centuries—from the 10th through the 13th centuries or later.